Feb 092017
 

Russell Howard

The month starts off with lots of laughs at the Royal Albert Hall. Russell Howard Round the World Live Tour is on 1-10 March. This ten day booking is the longest ever consecutive run of dates by a single comedian at the venue.

TV host of Russell Howard’s Good News, and considered one of the best-selling acts in British stand-up, Russell Howard returns to the live stage for the first time in three years with his biggest global tour to date.

Russell Howard

Design Museum

Imagine Moscow; Architecture, Propaganda, Revolution opens at the Design Museum on 15 March (and runs to 3 June 2017). Marking the centenary of the Russian Revolution, this exhibition explores Moscow as it was imagined by a bold new generation of architects and designers in the 1920s and early 1930s.

Drawing on rarely seen material, Imagine Moscow presents an idealistic vision of the Soviet capital that was never realised. Large-scale architectural drawings are supported by artwork, propaganda and publications from the period.

Each of the eight projects presented in the exhibition introduce a theme relevant to life and ideology in the Soviet Union: collectivisation, urban planning, aviation, communication, industrialisation, communal living and recreation.

Taken together, these unbuilt projects suggest an alternative reality for the city, offering a unique insight into the culture of the time.

Design Museum: imagine moscow: architecture, propaganda, revolution

Royal Academy

The Royal Academy has America after the Fall: Painting in the 1930s on from 25 February to 4 June 2017.

The devastating impact of the Great Depression, brought about by the Wall Street Crash of 1929 and followed by the Dust Bowl, caused America to enter the 1930s in flux. Over the next decade, the consequences of economic insecurity and social hardship, fuelled by mass urbanisation, industrialisation and immigration, reverberated throughout the country, as it struggled to rebuild. Artists endeavoured to capture these rapid changes, seeking to redefine American identity in their work, inadvertently creating a debate over what would become the national art form.

The show has 45 iconic works from Pollock, O’Keeffe and Hopper among others, and American Gothic by Grant Wood which has never before left America. It explores post-crash America in flux, with rapid social change and financial insecurities through what is being billed as a ‘once in a generation’ exhibition.

American Gothic


Grant Wood, American Gothic, 1930. The Art Institute of Chicago, friends of American Art Collection, 1930.934

National Gallery

While two excellent exhibitions close this month – Paul Nash at Tate Britain and Australia’s Impressionists at the National Gallery – another blockbuster opens.

Michelangelo & Sebastiano opens at The National Gallery on 15 March, and runs to 25 June 2017.

This major exhibition focuses on the extraordinary artistic relationship between Sebastiano del Piombo (about 1485–1547) and Michelangelo (1475–1564) from the 1510s through to the 1540s. In addition to covering their great collaborative projects, the exhibition includes works preceding their meeting, in part to better demonstrate the originality of their joint creations.

Their views on religious themes, how they worked together and how it helped both artists develop their own painting styles is explored.

Sebastiano del Piombo The Virgin and Child with Saint Joseph, Saint John the Baptist and a Donor, 1517

Sebastiano del Piombo
The Virgin and Child with Saint Joseph, Saint John the Baptist and a Donor, 1517
© The National Gallery, London

National Portrait Gallery

There are two new exhibitions at the National Portrait Gallery this month. Gillian Wearing and Claude Cahun: Behind the mask, another mask opens on 9 March (and runs to 29 May 2017), and Howard Hodgkin: Absent Friends opens on 23 March (and runs to 18 June 2017).

The first pairs the works of contemporary artist Gillian Wearing with the innovative early twentieth century photographer Claude Cahun. Both of them share a fascination with the self-portrait and use the self-image, through the medium of photography. While they were born seventy years apart, they share similar themes around gender, identity, masquerade and performance.

I am in training don't kiss me by Claude Cahun

I am in training don’t kiss me by Claude Cahun c. 1927; Copyright: Jersey Heritage

The second is devoted to the portraits of the British painter Howard Hodgkin. This important aspect of Hodgkin’s work has been largely overlooked because his work appears abstract.

With over 55 works from collections around the world and dating from 1949 to the present, the exhibition shows the development of Hodgkin’s portraits. The exhibition traces the evolution of the artist’s visual language and his engagement with a range of friends and others within the artist’s circle. Peter Blake, Stephen Buckley, Patrick Caulfield, David Hockney, Philip King, R.B.Kitaj and Richard Smith are among the many leading artists portrayed.

St Patrick’s Day

St Patrick’s Day is, of course, on 17 March but the London St Patrick’s Day parade is on Sunday 19 March. Building up to the big day there are free walking tours on 17, 18, and also on 19 March.

The parade goes from Piccadilly to Trafalgar Square where there’s a festival atmosphere for the rest of the day. The main stage has comedians, music and performances, and around the Square there will be plenty of street food stalls so you can stay all day.

Amy Winehouse

It’s worth heading up to Camden this month as the Jewish Museum has Amy Winehouse: A Family Portrait opening on 16 March (and on until 24 September 2017). I saw this exhibition when it was first staged here in 2013 and can definitely recommend it.

Get to know the real Amy Winehouse through her personal belongings, from family photographs to fashion. Items on display reflect Amy’s love for her family, London and more.

The exhibition is accompanied by a new Amy-themed street art trail which leads to the newly-commissioned installation ‘Love Is A Losing Game’ by renowned street artist Pegasus. The street art tours and installation are only available until 4 June but do seem like an excellent way to complement the exhibition.

Amy Winehouse

42nd Street

Broadway’s biggest show is coming to the West End’s biggest stage this month. 42nd Street previews at Theatre Royal Drury Lane from 20 March. You know the iconic songs already such as We’re in the Money and I Only Have Eyes For You.

42nd Street is the song and dance, American dream fable of Broadway. Young Peggy Sawyer is fresh off the bus from small-town America and just another face in the chorus line on Broadway’s newest show. But when the leading lady gets injured, Peggy might just have the shot at stardom she’s always dreamed of…

Grammy Award winner Sheena Easton joins an all singing, high-kicking cast as Dorothy Brock with Tom Lister as Julian Marsh and Clare Halse as Peggy Sawyer.

42nd Street

Even More

If you would like even more ideas for this month have a look at the March 2017 in London blog post from our sister hotel, London Bridge Hotel.

LOOKING AHEAD

With the arrival of spring, the Moomins will be coming out of hibernation and visiting Kew Gardens for all sorts of mischief and fun. See them at Kew’s Easter Festival from 1 to 17 April.

The National Army Museum in Chelsea is reopening on 30 March after a three-year redevelopment project. The site has been reconfigured to have five new galleries and a temporary exhibition space.

From April to October you can hire a pedal boat on the Serpentine. For those who want the views without the exertion there’s also the UK’s first Solarshuttle, that glides silently across the lake powered only by the sun.

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Do check out the latest offers as Kensington House Hotel has some great weekend deals. You can sign up for special offer alerts here.

Laura Porter writes AboutLondonLaura.com and contributes to many other publications while maintaining an impressive afternoon tea addiction. You can find Laura on twitter as @AboutLondon and on Facebook as @AboutLondonLaura.

Nov 232016
 

It’s the season to be jolly so we’ve got lots of fun ideas for the end of the year.

Christmas at Kew

Christmas at Kew is a fabulous mile long illuminated trail through the Gardens for a magical after dark experience.

This year there are also three artworks: a glittering Crystal Tree dripping with giant illuminated crystals, twelve enormous yet delicate colour-changing reeds rising high into the night sky, and seventy five pulsating crystal flowers scattered across the ground creating a shimmering crystal lawn.

The popular Tunnel of Lights is animated by 63,000 pixels creating patterns and pictures to a well-known Christmas soundtrack, and the Kew Christmas Karaoke Juke Box means the whole family can have a Christmas sing along.

The scented Fire Garden is perfect to warm up on a cold evening before the spectacular finale at the Palm House Pond sees an explosion of brightly coloured laser beams, streams of light and flickering orbs that dance in time to much-loved Christmas classics. Christmas at Kew is open from 23 November 2016 to 2 January 2017.

Christmas at Kew

© RBG Kew

Winter Wonderland

In central London, Winter Wonderland is back at Hyde Park for its 10th year. There are six weeks of festive fun from 18 November 2016 to 2 January 2017 and entry is free.

You can just go for a walk to soak up the atmosphere with the bright lights and Christmas tunes or stop for a drink at the Bavarian Village. The Christmas markets are great for gift shopping and there are thrill rides including The Munich Looping, the world’s largest transportable roller coaster.

It’s worth booking ahead for the attractions, especially on weekends when it guarantees you beat the queues. You can try ice skating or book tickets to see the professionals in The Nutcracker on Ice. Walk through The Magical Ice Kingdom (literally created from ice and snow) or head to Bar Ice where even the glasses are made of ice. And the best place to warm up – and to be entertained – is the Zippos Circus megadome where its always warm inside. Youngsters will love the morning Sooty Christmas Show, and the afternoon Zippos Christmas Show is great for everyone. The real thrill seekers should book for the evening Cirque Berserk where the stunts will amaze.

Winter Wonderland

Victorian Christmas

Kensington Palace, the childhood home of Queen Victoria, is dressed for a Victorian Christmas from 26 November 2016 to 2 January 2017. Included in palace admission there are live Christmas themed musical performances and the chance to take part in a drop-in lantern-making workshop.

Musical entertainment is from The Prince Regent’s Band, formed to explore the wealth of historic chamber music for brass and wind instruments from a period roughly defined as between the French Revolution of 1785 and the end of First World War in 1918.

They will be performing Christmas carols that were popular in Victorian times, played entirely on 19th century brass instruments, and the band will take time between carols to tell you both about the carols they’re performing and the instruments themselves.

Kensington Palace at Christmas

© Historic Royal Palaces

Hampton Court Palace

At another Historic Royal Palace in London, Hampton Court Palace is having an Elizabethan Christmas from 21 to 23 December and 27 December to 1 January. Travel back in time to Elizabethan England and the Tudor court in 1592 as Hampton Court Palace celebrates the festive season in royal style. Queen Elizabeth I is in attendance with her court, promising live drama, historic cookery and musical performance.

If the festive season means indulging in a feast the BBC Good Food Festive Fayre is at Hampton Court Palace from 9 to 11 December. From the best local and British produce to Christmas-themed music and carolling, the weekend offers culinary delights, all set against the stunning backdrop of the palace’s historic Tudor courtyards. (Entrance is included in palace admission.)

And if all you want to do is sing at this time of year why not join one of Hampton Court’s annual carol singing evenings and get into the festive spirit in truly palatial surroundings? Carol Singing is on 18, 19, 21, 22, 23 December and 5 January. (Book tickets in advance.)

Hampton Court Palace at Christmas

© Historic Royal Palaces

Royal Albert Hall

From 30 November to 4 December, tennis greats bring their skills and loads of fun to the Champions Tennis tournament at the Royal Albert Hall. Grand Slam Champions, former World No.1s and national icons return to the Hall for a dazzling display of high quality tennis and entertainment.

Players include two-time US Open Champion Pat Rafter, seven-time Grand Slam Champion John McEnroe, British fan favourite Tim Henman and former British Number 1 Greg Rusedski.

And from 13 to 24 December it’s the Royal Albert Hall Christmas Festival with lots of festive concerts, including Carols by Candlelight on 23 and 24 December.

Royal Albert Hall at Christmas

Rent

A new production celebrating the 20th anniversary of RENT the Musical opens at the St James Theatre on 8 December (and is on until 28 January 2017).

Inspired by Puccini’s classic opera La Boheme, RENT features unforgettable music and lyrics by Jonathan Larson including the much-loved songs Seasons of Love, Take Me or Leave Me and La Vie Boheme. Winner of four Tony Awards, six Drama Desk Awards and the hugely prestigious Pulitzer Prize for Drama, it ran on Broadway for an astonishing 12 years.

This landmark musical tells the story of a group of impoverished young artist friends struggling to survive in New York City’s East Village in the thriving days of 1980s Bohemian excess.

Rent the Musical

Australian Impressionism

The National Gallery has the first UK exhibition to focus on Australian Impressionism, a significant and distinctive movement, little known compared with the European movement. The exhibition is on from 7 December 2016 to 26 March 2017, and showcases four innovative Australian Impressionist artists, Tom Roberts, Arthur Streeton, Charles Conder, and John Russell.

Roberts, Streeton, and Conder came to epitomise a growing sense of national identity, yet Russell, by contrast, was an Australian expatriate who spent almost his entire career in France, building friendships with Van Gogh, Monet, and Matisse.

Golden Summer, Eaglemont, 1889

Golden Summer, Eaglemont, 1889 by Arthur Streeton
© National Gallery of Australia, Canberra

Lazarus

Written by David Bowie and Enda Walsh, Lazarus is the musical sequel to the cult classic film The Man Who Fell to Earth. On at the King’s Cross Theatre until 22 January 2017, the show originally premiered off-Broadway in the final weeks of Bowie’s life. Michael C Hall, best known for his role as the moonlighting serial killer in Dexter, and Michael Esper (A Beautiful Mind) reprise their roles from the original New York production.

Lazarus focuses on Thomas Newton, as he remains still on Earth – a ‘man’ unable to die, his head soaked in cheap gin and haunted by a past love. The story follows Newton during the course of a few days where the arrival of another lost soul might finally set him free. Lazarus is predictably abstract but compelling, and a must-watch for Bowie fans. The soundtrack is a goldmine of 70s Bowie hits, plus a few tracks penned solely for the stage show.

Lazarus the Musical

Ladybird Books

The Charles Dickens Museum is celebrating the classic Ladybird children’s books with an exhibition of The Ladybird Life of Dickens: An Illustrated Adventure on from 30 November 2016 to 16 April 2017.

Visitors can see 24 original illustrations that English artist John Kenney (who also illustrated Thomas the Tank Engine) produced for the 1965 Ladybird book on Dickens. The accompanying words came from English author and playwright L. du Garde Peach for the book, An Adventure in History: Charles Dickens. Du Garde Peach classifies Dickens as a storyteller who drew upon ‘the events of his life, and the characters whom he knew’ to people his books and create his stories.

As the exhibition opens, Dickens’s Bloomsbury townhouse is dressed for a beautiful celebration of a Victorian Christmas; the historic rooms into which Dickens moved with his growing family in 1837 will be filled with the atmosphere of a 19th-century London Christmas.

Christmas at the Charles Dickens Museum runs from 30 November 2016 until 8 January 2017. Among this year’s highlights are atmospheric candlelit evenings, late nights and tours of the House, captivating performances of A Christmas Carol and a whole day of celebration on Christmas Eve.

Charles Dickens - A Ladybird Book

Peter Pan Cup

If you’re staying at the Kensington House Hotel this Christmas you’ll be able to take a Christmas Day morning stroll to the Serpentine Lake in Hyde Park to watch the annual Serpentine Swimming Club Peter Pan Cup races.

Swimmers have met in London’s Hyde Park on Christmas morning since 1864 to compete in the Christmas Day swim. It became the Peter Pan Cup in 1904 when author J.M. Barrie donated the cup in the same year his Peter Pan play appeared on the London stage.

You can’t join in though as The Peter Pan Cup is only open to members of the Serpentine Swimming Club who have qualified during the season. Do be aware, the water is usually below 4C (40F) in the winter and I’ve even seen them have to break the ice just to get in.

The race on 25 December starts at 9am and takes place on the south bank of the lake. Spectators are always welcome as everyone needs some encouragement on a chilly day.

Peter Pan Swimming Cup

© Serpentine Swimming Club

Natural History Museum Ice Rink

The Natural History Museum Ice Rink is open until 8 January 2017 on the Museum’s East Lawn. It’s a lovely location, especially in the evening when the museum makes a wonderful backdrop. The ice rink stays open until at least 10pm each day making it great destination even after the museum has closed.

The Cafe Bar is available for non-skaters too and there’s a viewing platform to look down on your friends doing their Torvill and Dean (or Bambi) impressions. It’s a good place to warm up after skating with a delicious hot chocolate too.

Natural History Museum Ice Rink

Even More

If you would like even more ideas for this month have a look at the December 2016 in London blog post from our sister hotel, London Bridge Hotel.

LOOKING AHEAD

Lockwood Kipling: Arts and Crafts in the Punjab and London opens at the V&A on 14 January 2017. This is the first exhibition exploring the life and work of Lockwood Kipling (1837-1911), an artist, teacher, curator and influential figure in the Arts and Crafts movement. Lockwood Kipling was a social campaigner for the preservation of Indian crafts, a craftsman whose terracotta panels can still be seen on the exterior of the V&A and was an illustrator of books by his son, the renowned writer Rudyard Kipling.

The Winter Wanders are free led walks across London on 28 & 29 January 2017. It’s a wonderful excuse to get outside and leave the winter hibernation behind.

And the Magical Lantern Festival returns to Chiswick House Gardens on 19 January 2017 with light sculptures and other attractions to mark the end of Chinese New Year, including a 15-metre illuminated sculpture of the Houses of Parliament. The theme for 2017 is the Silk Road, with Europe, Asia, Arabia, Egypt, Persia, India and Ancient China all represented. Centre stage will be a full-size replica of the ship that Chinese Admiral Zheng used on his trade explorations.

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Do check out the latest offers as Kensington House Hotel has some great weekend deals. You can sign up for special offer alerts here.

Laura Porter writes AboutLondonLaura.com and contributes to many other publications while maintaining an impressive afternoon tea addiction. You can find Laura on twitter as @AboutLondon and on Facebook as @AboutLondonLaura.

Jan 252016
 

The last month of winter can mean a few sprinkles of snow in London but nothing to stop you from enjoying the city. Here are some of the best things to do to enjoy February in London.

Magical Lantern Festival

Light festivals are proving to be incredibly popular in London and this one looks like a ‘must see’. From 3 February to 6 March, Chiswick House Gardens has more than 50 giant illuminated creations including a 10m-high recreation of Beijing’s Temple of Heaven and an 8m Imperial Palace, plus a lit-up life-size London bus and a phone box lantern.

You can also see life-sized flamingos, zebras, kangaroos and elephants nestled among the trees — a nod to the history of Chiswick House Garden, where former owner, the sixth Duke of Devonshire, kept these exotic beasts in its expansive gardens.

The event runs in the evening from 5pm to 8.45pm. The Magical Lantern Festival marks Chinese New Year, the year of the monkey.

magical lantern festival

Chinese New Year

We’re welcoming the Year of the Monkey with Chinese New Year celebrations in London on Sunday 14 February. The parade starts at 10.15am and goes from Trafalgar Square to nearby Chinatown with ten lion teams performing along the short route. There are displays in Trafalgar Square and Chinatown for the rest of the day.

Cirque Berserk

To see some “Wowzer, how do they do that?!” performances you need to see Cirque Berserk at The Peacock Theatre from 8 to 24 February. This is real circus made for theatre and includes the world’s most dangerous circus act – the legendary motorcycle ‘Globe of Terror’. That’s up to four motorcyclists inside a metal sphere cage riding at up to 60mph!

Cirque Berserk

Monet to Matisse

Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse is at Royal Academy of Arts from 30 January to 20 April. It’s not just the two great painters mentioned in the title who are feature in this exhibition though. This landmark exhibition examines the role gardens played in the evolution of art from the early 1860s through to the 1920s. Expect to see works by Renoir, Cezanne, Pissarro, Klimt, Van Gogh and more.

Monet Waterlillies

Claude Monet, 1914-1915, oil on canvas, Museum Purchase: Helen Thurston Ayer Fund. Photo (c) Portland Art Museum, Portland, Oregon

Pre-Raphaelites on Paper

Moving from painting to drawing, at the stunning Leighton House in Kensington, Pre-Raphaelites on Paper: Victorian Drawings from the Lanigan Collection opens on 12 February (and runs until 29 May 2016).

Illustrating the broad evolution of draughtsmanship and the new appreciation for the art of drawing that emerged during the reign of Queen Victoria, from 1837 to 1901, the selection of artworks ranges from preparatory sketches to highly finished drawings intended as works of art in themselves.

Highlights are the works of the foremost Pre-Raphaelite artists, John Everett Millais, William Holman Hunt and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, as well as exceptional drawings by artists such as Edward Burne-Jones, Simeon Solomon, George Frederic Watts, and Frederic Leighton himself.

Dickensian

Here’s another good reason to visit the Charles Dickens Museum. From 19 January to 17 April 2016, the new BBC Drama series Dickensian has brought behind the scenes costumes and props to the most Dickensian house in London. As you enter each room there will be additions from the TV series helping to build the atmosphere and to get to know the characters.

More reasons to visit this month include The Housemaid’s Tour on Sunday 21 February, and The Museum by Candlelight on Wednesday 24 February.

Dickensian

Delacroix and the Rise of Modern Art

From 17 February to 22 May 2016, The National Gallery has Delacroix and the Rise of Modern Art.

Described as the last painter of the Grand Style and the first of the modern masters, Eugène Delacroix (1798–1863) was the pre-eminent French artist of the first half of the 19th century – complex, contradictory, a rebel, and an outsider. Few artists had more of a profound and lasting influence on his contemporaries and future generations.

This exhibitions looks not only at Delacroix’s fantastic Romantic masterpieces but also how his work influenced the Impressionists and beyond.

Olive Trees Vincent Van Gogh

Olive Trees, Vincent Van Gogh (1889)

Vogue 100: A Century of Style

It’s the centenary of Vogue magazine and this exhibition showcases the remarkable range of photography that has been commissioned by British Vogue since it was founded in 1916. Vogue 100: A Century of Style is at the National Portrait Gallery from 11 February to 22 May 2016.

There are over 280 prints from the Condé Nast archive and international collections on display to tell the story of one of the most influential fashion magazines in the world.

 

Also, available to see this month at the National Portrait Gallery is a major display of personal items, original manuscripts and works of art to mark the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charlotte Brontë, author of Jane Eyre. The display opens on 22 February and runs until 14 August 2016. It explores the author’s life, creative development and professional success.

Fashion Rules: Restyled

From 11 February, the Fashion Rules exhibition at Kensington Palace reopens with a new focus on different periods in the wardrobes of HM The Queen, Princess Margaret and Diana, Princess of Wales, expanding our glimpse into the era-defining style choices of these three royal women.

From the ‘New Look’ glamour of Princess Margaret in the 1950s, the elegance of HM The Queen in the 1960s and 1970s, and the tailored drama of outfits created for Diana, Princess of Wales in the early 1990s, the display continues to explore how these women navigated the fashion ‘rules’ defined by their royal duties in unique style.

Fashion Rules, Kensington Palace

Another reason to visit Kensington Palace this month is for the Victoriana: Science and Séance event on 13 February. You can find out how science, religion, fanaticism and the supernatural co-existed and what this meant for morality, beliefs and culture in Victorian society. Tickets includes a glass of Bucks Fizz and entry to Kensington Palace.

Even More

If you would like even more ideas for this month have a look at the February 2016 in London blog post from London Bridge Hotel, our sister hotel.

LOOKING AHEAD

Easter is slightly earlier this year so we’re being celebrating in March (Easter Sunday is 27 March 2016).

It’s the Hampton Court Palace Half Marathon on 20 March that includes road routes and Thames river paths.

And Kew Palace reopens at Kew Gardens on 24 March where you can see The Royal Kitchens and Queen Charlotte’s Cottage too.

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Do check out the latest offers as Kensington House Hotel has some great weekend deals. You can sign up for special offer alerts here.

Laura Porter writes the About.com London Travel site and AboutLondonLaura.com and contributes to many other publications while sustaining an afternoon tea addiction to rival that of our Queen. You can find Laura on twitter as @AboutLondon and on Facebook as @AboutLondonLaura.

Sep 282015
 

October means the evenings are drawing in and getting ready for Halloween at the end of the month. The clocks go back one hour on Sunday 25 October and there is a school holiday on 26-30 October.

The V&A

The highlight of the V&A’s India Season, The Fabric of India is the first major exhibition to explore the dynamic and multifaceted world of Indian handmade textiles from the 3rd to the 21st century. Opening on 3 October and running until 10 January 2016.

Wall hanging (detail), cotton applique, Gujarat Credit: Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Wall hanging (detail), cotton applique, Gujarat
Credit: Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Included is a spectacular 18th-century tent belonging to Tipu Sultan, a stunning range of historic costume, highly prized textiles made for trade, and fashion by contemporary Indian designers such as Manish Arora and Rajesh Pratap Singh. Over 200 objects illustrate the skills, variety and adaptability of Indian textile makers and the enduring nature of techniques for dyeing, weaving and embroidery across India.

V&A evening events this month include supermodel Cindy CrawfordNadja Swarovski from the crystal business, and designer John Galliano.

 

Natural History Museum

Across the road at the Natural History Museum, The Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2015 exhibition opens on 16 October. Wrestling komodo dragons, ethereal egrets and curious squirrels are among the creatures captured on camera by this year’s finalists.

The exhibition showcases the beauty, magnificence and diversity of life on our planet, while also highlighting its fragility and the role photography can play in preserving it. Incredible work from talented professionals and gifted amateur photographers from around the globe.

Squirrel and seagull face to face. The photo was taken in Morro Bay, California (USA).

“To drink or not” Squirrel and seagull face to face. The photo was taken in Morro Bay, California (USA) by Carlos Perez Naval, finalist in the 10 and under category.

While at the Natural History Museum, why not try David Attenborough’s First Life Virtual Reality Experience which is on until 25 October?

Journey back to the ancient ocean with Sir David Attenborough in this fully immersive experience that brings natural history to life through cinematic virtual reality technology. Narrated by Sir David Attenborough, the experience takes you on a 3D journey to meet some of the Earth’s earliest inhabitants.

 

Trafalgar Square

There are always lots of reasons to visit this iconic location. One of the best reasons this month is to see Goya: The Portraits at the National Portrait Gallery on the north side of Trafalgar Square. Opening on 7 October, this major exhibition features one of Spain’s most celebrated artists.

Photo by Diliff, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo by Diliff, via Wikimedia Commons

Or why not visit on Saturday 10 October for Africa on the Square 2015? It’s a celebration of African culture with live music and a DJ, a fashion show, food, a market and a popular family area.

The next day is great too as Sunday 11 October is The Diwali Festival. This is the Hindu, Sikh and Jain festival of lights. The Children’s Parade re-enacts the return of victorious Lord Ram to his Kingdom, and there’s contemporary Asian music as well as traditional religious music and rites to open and close the show. The food is exceptional at this event and there’s always activities for the kids too.

 

NFL in London

At the start of the month, the New York Jets play against the Miami Dolphins at Wembley Stadium on Sunday 4 October. But even if you don’t have tickets the NFL Fan Rally in Trafalgar Square on Saturday 3 October is worth attending as it’s a great atmosphere.

American Football has a growing following in London so expect some crowds and some top entertainment from players, cheerleaders and NFL legends.

Later in the month you can have some fun on Regent Street ahead of the Buffalo Bills at Jacksonville Jaguars game at Wembley Stadium on Sunday 25 October.

On Saturday 24 October it’s the NFL Fan Festival on Regent Street with lots of entertainment, popular on-stage events and a mini field for the junior players.

 

Regent Street Motor Show

Another reason to visit Regent Street, and a great alternative to the obvious Halloween activities, is the Regent Street Motor Show on Saturday 31 October.

The annual motoring event is back to delight motoring fans with an array of classic, vintage and super cars on display along Regent Street. Visitors will be able to get up close and personal with amazing vehicles before they all head off on the London to Brighton Veteran Car Run the next day.

Regent Street Motor Show

Photo © Garry Knight

 

Foodie Love

It’s the London Restaurant Festival so all month there are dining tours and some really interesting foodie tours.

And 12-18 October is Chocolate Week where this sweet treat is honoured with a popular Chocolate Show on 16-18 October where you can buy from iconic brands, meet chefs and cocoa experts.

 

Even More

If you would like even more ideas for this month have a look at the October 2015 in London blog post from London Bridge Hotel, our sister hotel.

 

LOOKING AHEAD

We’ve got to be brave and admit Christmas needs to be mentioned as the Christmas lights will all be switched on during November.

Christmas at Kew looks really good as the botanical gardens are illuminated after dark from 25 November.

The V&A keeps on bringing us something new and exciting. Bejewelled Treasures: The Al Thani Collection has spectacular Indian jewellery, drawn from a single private collection. Highlights include Mughal jades, a rare jewelled gold finial from the throne of Tipu Sultan, and pieces that reveal the dramatic changes that took place in Indian jewellery design during the early 20th century.

And The V&A keeps on improving as the Toshiba Gallery of Japanese Art reopens on 4 November after a full redisplay and refurbishment as part of the V&A’s ongoing FuturePlan scheme.

An unusual but interesting idea for next month is Sleeve Notes with Alan Parsons – lectures hosted in Abbey Road’s legendary Studio Two. Alan Parsons is a lauded producer and musician synonymous with Pink Floyd, The Beatles and Abbey Road Studios.

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Do check out the latest offers as Kensington House Hotel has some great weekend deals. You can sign up for special offer alerts here.

Laura Porter writes the About.com London Travel site and contributes to many other publications while sustaining an afternoon tea addiction to rival that of our Queen. You can find Laura on twitter as @AboutLondon and on Facebook as @AboutLondonLaura.

Jun 262015
 

Ah, summer is here. Brighter light and warmer days so it’s time to get out and enjoy London.

If you go to the Natural History Museum this month do go to the Museum’s Wildlife Garden which is a haven for thousands of British plants and animals and demonstrates wildlife conservation in an urban environment. It’s also a lovely place to stop with a snack and enjoy the sunshine.

Other reasons to visit include The Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition, on until 30 August, Coral Reefs: Secret Cities of the Sea, on until 13 September, and Sensational Butterflies on the East Lawn also on until 13 September.

 

Across the road at The V&A you have one more month to see Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty as it closes on 2 August. As I explained back in March, this is the first and largest retrospective of the late designer’s work to be presented in Europe and the show has been incredibly popular.

 

If all that colour inspires you, why not visit the RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show which is on from 30 June to 5 July. Unlike the Chelsea Flower Show, you can buy tickets on the door and it’s in the grounds of Hampton Court Palace so you can visit both on the same day. It’s the 25th year of the HCP Flower Show and you can enjoy gardens, flowers, food, talks, shopping and more. Hampton Court Palace is also have celebrations for its 500th anniversary this year.

 

Another great day trip in west London is Kew Gardens and the Full of Spice Festival is on all summer. If you would prefer to visit in the evening Kew the Music is on from 7 to 12 July with Paloma Faith being a particular highlight. Or, on 22 and 23 July, you could return for Kew the Movies and enjoy an open-air cinema experience.

Kew The Music © RBG Kew

Kew The Music © RBG Kew

 

For more amazing evening entertainment, Sadler’s Wells has Matthew Bourne’s The Car Man on from 14 July to 9 August. Loosely based on Bizet’s popular opera this dance thriller is set in 1960s America where the dreams and passions of a small town are shattered by the arrival of a handsome stranger.

 

If you are looking to do some shopping, Summer Streets at Regent Street means traffic-free Sundays throughout July. There will be music and a cycle roadshow and each Sunday is themed: Garden, Health & Fitness, Fashion, Arts & Culture.

 

On every Saturday and Sunday in July you could relive the drama and grandeur of the Napoleonic War with Waterloo Weekend at Apsley House. As it is the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo you are invited to march with the Red Coats, take etiquette lessons and learn to dress the Regency way.

ApsleyHouse

 

For something unusual, the National Gallery has Soundscapes: Listening to Paintings from 8 July to 6 September. The Gallery asked six sound artists and musicians to create new work in response to a painting from the collection. Each artist has a room in the Sainsbury Wing exhibition galleries in which their chosen painting and their sound/musical response is installed.

Paul Cézanne - Bathers (Les Grandes Baigneuses), about 1894-1905  © The National Gallery, London

Paul Cézanne – Bathers (Les Grandes Baigneuses),
about 1894-1905
© The National Gallery, London

 

If you would like more good sounds then head to Eltham Palace as there is Jazz on a Sunday Afternoon on Sunday 5 and Sunday 19 July. The grounds are lovely for wandering and you could have a picnic while listening and relaxing.

 

If you are feeling hungry, Foodies Festival at Alexandra Palace, on 3-5 July, brings an outdoor summer feast with celebrity chefs, food and drink theatres, artisan producers and more street food than you can shake a satay stick at.

foodies-festival

Even More

If you would like even more ideas for this month have a look at the July 2015 in London blog post from London Bridge Hotel, our sister hotel.

LOOKING AHEAD

This year, for the first time ever at the Summer Opening of Buckingham Palace, displays throughout the State Rooms will recreate the settings for state visits, receptions, garden parties, investitures and private audiences. From 1 August to 27 September.

Back at Apsley House there is a Regency Weekend on 29 and 30 August where there will be plenty of dancing and you may well feel like you’ve stepped into a Jane Austen novel.

And August has a Bank Holiday weekend which is celebrated with the annual Notting Hill Carnival on 30-31 August. The carnival parade has amazing costumes and very loud music so best keep on dancing!

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Do check out the latest offers as Kensington House Hotel has some great weekend deals. You can sign up for special offer alerts here.

Laura Porter writes the About.com London Travel site and contributes to many other publications while sustaining an afternoon tea addiction to rival that of our Queen. You can find Laura on twitter as @AboutLondon and on Facebook as @AboutLondonLaura.