Sep 122017
 

Royal Albert Hall

On Friday 20 October at the Royal Albert Hall, Michael Giacchino at 50 celebrates the 50th birthday of the most in-demand composer in Hollywood. Some of Hollywood’s hottest directors are joining Michael Giacchino on stage at the acclaimed composer’s first ever major career retrospective.

Born in New Jersey in October 1967, Giacchino began his career writing video game music for DreamWorks. After being talent-spotted by Steven Spielberg, he became the first person to write an orchestral score for the PlayStation.

His scores for the hit TV series Alias and Lost – for which he won an Emmy – were followed by feature films: Mission Impossible III, Super 8, Star Trek and Star Trek Into Darkness.

He became one of animation studio Pixar’s favourite composers, creating the music for smash-hit successes Ratatouille, The Incredibles, Inside Out and, most memorably, Up, which won him an Oscar, BAFTA, Golden Globe and Grammy.

Subsequent successes have included Jurassic World, Zootropolis, Doctor Strange and Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, being the musical director for the Oscars in 2008, and dominating this summer at the box-office, with the scores for War for the Planet of the Apes and Spider-Man: Homecoming.

Michael Giacchino at 50

National Portrait Gallery

Opening on 6 October at the National Portrait Gallery, Julian Opie after Van Dyck features one of Britain’s foremost contemporary artists. Julian Opie has been invited to present his work in dialogue with Van Dyck’s self-portrait (c.1640) in the 17th century galleries in this free display.

While, at first glance, Opie’s portraits are distinctly modern in their concise and abstracted forms, the style, composition and media are inspired by a variety of historic and contemporary visual sources. These range from ancient Egyptian and Roman art, and Dutch and British painted portraits of the 17th and 18th centuries, to 18th and 19th century Japanese prints, and the symbolic language of modern signage.

The influence of 17th century British portraiture on the works in this display is evident in the elegant pose of several of the sitters, and the turning postures that playfully reference Van Dyck’s self-portrait. Viewing the old and new portraits side by side illuminates the influence and continuing relevance of Old Masters such as Van Dyck on British contemporary portrait practice.

(from left) George. by Julian Opie, 2014; Self-portrait by Anthony van Dyck, c. 1640 © National Portrait Gallery; Faime. by Julian Opie, 2016

Kensington Palace

There’s a special study day happening on 14 October at Kensington Palace. Participants at A Very British Princess will enjoy a private view of Kensington Palace’s Enlightened Princesses exhibition, followed by expert lectures exploring just how ‘British’ the Georgian royal women were. With talks, demonstrations on science, dance and the arts, the day explores the national identities and cultural influences working in Georgian court and what this meant for wider society.

On 21 October, Kensington Palace plays host to the theatre company Austentatious who put on an entirely improvised comedy play in the style of Jane Austen. The cast creates a riotously funny new literary masterpiece, based on a title suggested by the audience. Dressed in full Regency costume and complete with live musical accompaniment, the company explore the themes of 19th century roles for women, royal scandals and Georgian etiquette through raucous comedy theatre.

Austentatious at Kenington Palace

National Gallery

Opening on 2 October at the National Gallery, Reflections: Van Eyck and The Pre-Raphaelites transports us back to art in the middle ages through to the 19th century. The exhibition looks at the lasting impact of Van Eyck’s Arnolfini masterpiece on Pre-Raphaelite artists Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John Everett Millais and William Holman Hunt.

Acquired by the National Gallery in 1842, the Arnolfini Portrait informed the Pre-Raphaelites’ belief in empirical observation, their ideas about draughtsmanship, colour and technique, and the ways in which objects in a picture could carry symbolic meaning.

Jan van Eyck Portrait of Giovanni (?) Arnolfini and his Wife and 'The Arnolfini Portrait' 1434

Jan van Eyck – Portrait of Giovanni (?) Arnolfini and his Wife and ‘The Arnolfini Portrait’’, 1434
© The National Gallery, London

Kew Gardens

Handmade at Kew returns to Kew Gardens for 12 – 15 October. It’s an innovative craft fair organised by Handmade in Britain where you can browse and buy directly from artists and craft-makers.

This international contemporary craft event offers you the opportunity to meet and buy directly from over 200 extraordinary designer-makers working across all disciplines including ceramics, jewellery, fashion and textiles, glass, paper, furniture, metalwork, sculpture and interior accessories.

The event is housed in an elegant pavilion next to Kew Palace and tickets to the event include entry to both the event and Kew Gardens.

Sackler crossing - Kew Gardens

British Library

To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the publication of J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, the British LIbrary have Harry Potter: A History of Magic opening on 20 October. It showcases wizarding books, manuscripts and magical objects, and combines centuries-old British Library treasures with original material from Bloomsbury Publishing’s and J.K. Rowling’s own archives.

A highlight is the gargantuan 16th century Ripley Scroll that explains how to create a Philosopher’s Stone. The structure of the exhibition has been inspired by the subjects that Harry and his friends studied at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, from Potions and Herbology, to Astronomy and Care of Magical Creatures.

DETAIL - A phoenix rising from the ashes in a 13th-century bestiary (c) British Library

DETAIL – A phoenix rising from the ashes in a 13th-century bestiary (c) British Library

London Transport Museum

Poster Girls is opening at the London Transport Museum on 13 October. This major new exhibition celebrates female poster artists and reveals the stories behind their work. With over 150 original posters and original artworks on display, the exhibition celebrates the often hidden contribution of female artists to the rise of the poster over the last hundred years. Starting in the early 1900s when poster art was in its infancy, the exhibition charts the key role played by London Transport in commissioning women designers and providing a platform for their art.

As well as original posters, the exhibition includes letters, books, ceramics, photographs and original artworks.

Visitors can be amongst the first to enjoy the exhibition at the Friday Late launch evening on 13 October. The evening has talks, music and a bar, make-and-take workshops, a pub-style quiz, special curator tours of the new exhibition and the chance to see the museum’s collection after dark.

Poster Girls - London Transport Museum

Even More

If you would like even more ideas for this month have a look at the October 2017 in London blog post from our sister hotel, London Bridge Hotel.

LOOKING AHEAD

Opening on 10 November at the Natural History Museum, Venom: Killer and Cure explores the visceral fear and ever-lasting fascination that venom evokes. This groundbreaking exhibition explores venom as the ultimate weapon found in nature occurring throughout the animal kingdom.

The Design Museum has a major exhibition opening on 15 November. Ferrari: Under the Skin reveals the fascinating history of the brand and celebrates 70 years of precision design, from the launch of the first Ferrari car in 1947 to the latest car production.

And on 2 November at Tate Britain Impressionists in London French Artists in Exile opens. The exhibition focuses on the French artists who sought refuge in London during and after the Franco-Prussian War (1870-71). This is the first large-scale exhibition to map the connections between French and British artists, patrons and art dealers during this traumatic period in French history.

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Do check out the latest offers as Kensington House Hotel has some great weekend deals. You can sign up for special offer alerts here.

Laura Porter writes AboutLondonLaura.com and contributes to many other publications while maintaining an impressive afternoon tea addiction. You can find Laura on twitter as @AboutLondon and on Facebook as @AboutLondonLaura.

Aug 172017
 

Kew Gardens

Here are a couple of great reasons to go to Kew Gardens this month.

It’s not the end of the summer open-air film opportunities in London yet as Kew the Movies outdoor cinema festival is back. On 6 September you can see Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction and on 7 September it’s time to sing-a-long to Grease.

Do note, there’s no seating so you’ll be relaxing on the grass but you don’t need to bring a picnic as food and drink is available.

Kew Gardens - Kew The Movies

© RBG Kew

Or come in the daytime to admire the Gardens as Sculpt at Kew is on from 18 September to 15 October. There are more than 70 sculptures displayed across the Gardens making it a wonderful excuse to stroll and explore.

The artworks are by over 30 renowned British and international artists and include stunning figurative, abstract and modern sculptures in a range of media including ceramics, bronze, glass and woodwork.

And, as an added bonus, all of these original works of contemporary art are available to buy.

Vintage Summer Steam

I’ve done this and can assure you Vintage Summer Steam really is a lot of fun. On 9 and 10 September, passengers can enjoy journeys evocative of the early 20th century when the Metropolitan No. 1 steam locomotive and the 1938 art deco Tube stock train run on the Metropolitan line between Amersham and Harrow-on-the-Hill.

The heritage vehicles also include Steam Locomotive No. 9466, two class 20 diesel locomotives, and the 1950s ex British Rail coaches resplendent in their new London Transport red livery.

Costumed characters bring the history of past travel to life at Amersham station. And there is also a pop-up vintage tea experience for day trippers who purchase a tea room ticket.

On Saturday 9 September The Susie Qs, a 1940s close-harmony trio are singing Andrew’s Sisters classics and performing the dance moves to match. And on Sunday 10 September passengers can take a free heritage bus ride from Amersham Station to Amersham Old Town for the town’s annual Heritage Day where there is live bands, market stalls and a children’s area and fairground.

Vintage Summer Steam

Scythians

Opening on 14 September at the British Museum, Scythians: warriors of ancient Siberia explores the story of the Scythians – nomadic tribes and masters of mounted warfare, who flourished between 900 and 200 BC. Their influence was felt all over Central Asia – from China to the northern Black Sea.

For centuries all trace of their culture was lost – buried beneath the ice – but discoveries of ancient tombs have unearthed a wealth of Scythian treasures that are revealing the truth about these people’s lives.

The Scythians were exceptional horsemen and warriors, and feared adversaries and neighbours of the ancient Greeks, Assyrians and Persians. This exhibition tells their story through exciting archaeological discoveries and perfectly preserved objects frozen in time.

If, like me, you know little about this area of history, the British Museum have written this helpful article to introduce the Scythians.

Scythian rider

Scythian rider. gold plaque depicting a Scythian rider with a spear in his right hand; Gold; Second half of the fourth century BC; Kul’ Oba.© The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, 2017. Photo: V Terebenin.

Drawn in Colour

Drawn in Colour: Degas from the Burrell is a free exhibition at the National Gallery. Opening on 20 September (and on until April 2018), this is a rare opportunity to see stunning paintings, pastels, and drawings by leading French Impressionist Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas (1834–1917).

The Burrell Collection in Glasgow holds one of the greatest collections of Degas’s works in the world. Rarely seen in public, this exhibition marks the first time the group of pastels has been shown outside of Scotland, since they were acquired at the beginning of the 20th century.

The Burrell’s thirteen pastels, three drawings, and four oil paintings, are exhibited alongside a selection of oil paintings and pastels from the National Gallery’s own Degas collection, as well as loans from other collections which relate thematically or stylistically to the Burrell works.

The exhibition marks the centenary of the artist’s death on 27 September 1917, and is a fitting tribute to one of the greatest creative figures of French art.

Degas - Ballet Dancers

Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas – Ballet Dancers (about 1890-1900).
© The National Gallery, London

BBC Proms in the Park

The Proms are on at the Royal Albert Hall until Saturday 9 September when there is the popular (but already sold-out) Last Night of the Proms. A wonderful way to still enjoy this finale event is at the BBC Proms in the Park in Hyde Park.

There are big screen link-ups to the performances at the Royal Albert Hall plus live concerts too. It’s not all classical music here as legendary singer-songwriter and The Kinks frontman, Sir Ray Davies is the headline act.

Sir Ray is joined by leading soloists including bass-baritone Sir Bryn Terfel, singer and actress Elaine Paige and 1970’s sensation Gilbert O’Sullivan. Steps and Texas bring the pop songs, and the early evening entertainment also includes a performance from the cast of Five Guys Named Moe.

Proms In The Park

© Neil Rickard

Jasper Johns

Considered one of the most important artists of the 20th century, Jasper Johns is featured in a major exhibition at The Royal Academy from 23 September to 10 December. This landmark exhibition of this Honorary Royal Academician brings together his paintings, sculptures, prints and drawings to explore his unconventional and experimental approach.

This is the first comprehensive survey of the artist’s work to be held in the UK in 40 years. Over 150 works including sculpture, drawings and prints are on display, together with new work from the artist.

The exhibition span over 60 years from his early career, right up to the present time, bringing together artworks that rarely travel from international private and public collections.

Jasper Johns, Target, 1961.

Jasper Johns, Target, 1961. Encaustic and collage on canvas. 167.6 x 167.6 cm. The Art Institute of Chicago c Jasper Johns / VAGA, New York / DACS, London. Photo: c 2017. The Art Institute of Chicago / Art Resource, NY / Scala, Florence

Rachel Whiteread

Tate Britain has a major exhibition of work by Rachel Whiteread to celebrate her position as one of the UK’s most highly respected sculptors. From 12 September 2017 to 4 February 2018, we can see both large and small scale scultpures in the range of materials characteristically used by the artist – plaster, resin, rubber, concrete and metal.

This is the most substantial showing of Whiteread’s works from her 30 year career and includes new work not previously exhibited. The exhibition also has drawings and documentation of the public projects that have punctuated her career including House (1993-4) which existed for only a few months before its controversial destruction, and helped win Whiteread the Turner Prize in 1993.

Large-scale pieces include Untitled (Book Corridors) 1997-8 and Untitled (Room 101) 2003 – a cast of the room at the BBC’s broadcasting House thought to be the model for Room 101 in George Orwell’s dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty Four. And some of the smaller sculptures include casts in different materials and colours from architectural features such as floors, doors and windows to domestic objects such as tables, boxes and a selection of Torsos, Whiteread’s casts of hot water bottles.

Another highlight of the exhibition is Untitled (One Hundred Spaces) 1995 – an installation of 100 resin casts of the underside of chairs – shown in Tate Britain’s Duveen galleries.

Rachel Whiteread House 1993

Rachel Whiteread House 1993
Photo: Sue Omerod © Rachel Whiteread

Even More

If you would like even more ideas for this month have a look at the September 2017 in London blog post from our sister hotel, London Bridge Hotel.

LOOKING AHEAD

To mark the UK-India Year of Culture 2017-18, and celebrate the vibrant cultural history of the two countries, the Science Museum has the Illuminating India Season from 4 October 2017 to 19 March 2018. There will be two exhibitions celebrating the rich culture and history of innovation in India. One is an ambitious and unprecedented survey of photography in India from the emergence of the medium in the 19th century to the present day. The other highlights India’s long tradition of scientific thought from the ancient past to now.

Harry Potter: A History of Magic opens at the British Library on 20 October to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the publication of J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. Presenting a thrilling display of wizarding books, manuscripts and magical objects alongside centuries-old British Library treasures, this is about as close to the Hogwarts library as we’re ever likely to get.

Together the V&A and the Royal Opera House present a landmark exhibition exploring a vivid story of opera from its origins in late-Renaissance Italy to the present day. Opera: Passion, Power and Politics opens at the V&A on 30 September. Told through the lens of seven premieres in seven European cities, this immersive exhibition takes you on a journey through nearly 400 years, culminating in the international explosion of opera in the 20th and 21st centuries.

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Do check out the latest offers as Kensington House Hotel has some great weekend deals. You can sign up for special offer alerts here.

Laura Porter writes AboutLondonLaura.com and contributes to many other publications while maintaining an impressive afternoon tea addiction. You can find Laura on twitter as @AboutLondon and on Facebook as @AboutLondonLaura.

May 082017
 

Zoo Nights

Every Friday this month you can enjoy an after-hours adventure at London Zoo. Zoo Nights is for over 18s only so you can also take in fun tours and talks with grown-up themes: mating, death and the gruesome bits!

Test your knowledge in Zooniversity Challenge or become an eco-detective in an interactive, forensic trail that shines a light on the illegal wildlife trade. And along the way you’ll meet street entertainers and stilt walkers too.

Street food vendors will have dishes from around the globe, and the pop-up watering holes will keep you refreshed.

Zoo Nights - ZSL London Zoo

© ZSL London Zoo

Taste of London

Another reason to head to Regent’s Park is for Taste of London on 14-18 June. A highlight of the summer foodie calendar, it’s five days of eating, drinking and live entertainment.

Taste of London showcases the capital’s best restaurants, top chefs and leading food and drink brands. Restaurants serve taster-size signature dishes, world-class chefs offer live cooking demonstrations and there are interactive masterclasses and shopping opportunities with more than 200 food and drink purveyors in attendance.

Taste London

Pink Floyd

To mark 50 years since the band released their first single Arnold Layne, and over 200 million record sales later, this is the first major international retrospective of Pink Floyd.

The Pink Floyd Exhibition: Their Mortal Remains is on at the V&A until 1 October 2017. It’s  an immersive, multi-sensory and theatrical journey chronicling the music, iconic visuals and staging of the band, from the underground psychedelic scene in 1960s London to today.

Over 350 objects are featured including album sleeve artwork, posters and stage props.

David Gilmour playing the Black Strat in 1973/4

Pink Floyd circa 1972-75 by Jill Furmanovsky

Grayson Perry

Opening at the Serpentine Gallery on 8 June, Grayson Perry: The Most Popular Art Exhibition Ever! is a major exhibition of his latest work. Perry won the Turner Prize in 2003, was elected a Royal Academician in 2012, received a CBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honour’s List in 2013, and in 2015 became a Trustee of the British Museum and Chancellor of the University of Arts London.

Perry’s subject matter is drawn from his childhood and his life as a transvestite, as well as wider social issues ranging from class and politics to sex and religion. The artworks on display touch on themes including popularity and art, masculinity and the current social landscape.

Grayson Perry, Puff Piece, 2017

Grayson Perry, Puff Piece, 2017 © Grayson Perry Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London (photography Angus Mill)

Neon Workshop

This looks like a wonderful one-off event. Museum Makers: Illuminate London is a beginner-friendly neon workshop at the London Transport Museum on Thursday 22 June 2017.

The plan is to make your own neon style artwork inspired by the London skyline, architecture and landmarks. All materials and tuition plus a colourful cocktail and goody bag are included.

Do note, this workshop uses electro-luminescent wire, a safe battery-powered alternative to traditional glass and gas neon.

Open Garden Squares Weekend

Back for its twentieth year, Open Garden Squares Weekend is a well-loved annual event. Its a fabulous opportunity to visit over 200 private and little-known gardens across London. Taking place on Saturday 17 and Sunday 18 June, the Weekend includes a programme of tours, walks, talks and cycle rides.

Gardens taking part range from the historic and traditional to the new and experimental. They include roof gardens, wildlife gardens, community allotments, corporate places and diminutive, secret spaces, as well as gardens in schools, churches and shops.

When you select a garden on the website it offers helpful suggestions of other gardens nearby making it easy to plan a really enjoyable weekend.

Kings Bench Walk, Inner Temple Garden

Inner Temple Garden, © Barbara-Neumann

Lady Day

For this month’s theatre recommendation, Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill brings the extraordinary story of Billie Holliday’s life to Wyndham’s Theatre. Starring the six-time Tony Award winner, Broadway star Audra McDonald makes her West End debut as the legendary jazz icon.

Hear the personal stories of Holiday’s loves and losses through a turbulent but extraordinary life. And lose yourself in some of the most inspiring and moving songs ever written including God Bless the Child, What a Little Moonlight Can Do, Strange Fruit, Crazy He Calls Me and Taint Nobody’s Biz-ness.

The strictly limited season runs from 17 June to 9 September. Do be aware this production contains strong language and themes of an adult nature.

Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill

Giovanni da Rimini

The National Gallery, in Trafalgar Square, has Giovanni da Rimini: An Early 14th Century Masterpiece Reunited from 14 June to 8 October 2017. The exhibition showcases a recent purchase of an exquisite piece by this master, alongside a pairing piece loaned from Rome and works from his contemporaries.

With artwork on display from several exceptional ivory plaques to a collection of Italian Trecento paintings, this exhibition highlights the extraordinary quality of da Rimini’s painting and illuminates a key moment in the history of art, when emphasis on observation and realism was born.

Giovanni da Rimini - Scenes from the Lives of the Virgin and other Saints, 1300-1305

Giovanni da Rimini – Scenes from the Lives of the Virgin and other Saints, 1300-1305. © The National Gallery, London

BP Portrait Award

Also in Trafalgar Square, The BP Portrait Award opens at the National Portrait Gallery on 22 June (and runs until 24 September). 2017 marks the Portrait Award’s 38th year at the National Portrait Gallery. This highly successful annual event is aimed at encouraging artists over the age of eighteen to focus upon, and develop, the theme of portraiture in their work.

Selected from 2,580 entries by artists from 87 countries around the world, the BP Portrait Award 2017 represents the very best in contemporary portrait painting.

The three portraits in the running for the First Prize are Double Portrait, by French painter and illustrator, Thomas Ehretsmann, depicting his pregnant wife Caroline (see below); Breech! by Suffolk based artist, Benjamin Sullivan, which captures his wife Virginia breastfeeding their eight month old daughter; and Emma, Antony Williams’s portrait of model turned friend, Emma Bruce, completed in his studio in Chertsey. The prize winners will be announced on 20 June 2017.

Double Portrait by Thomas Ehretsmann

Double Portrait by Thomas Ehretsmann. © Thomas Ehretsmann

Phil Collins

And the last recommendation is walking distance from the Kensington House Hotel. Phil Collins is on at the Royal Albert Hall from 4 to 9 June with his Not Yet Dead tour.

With 100 million record sales to his name, more UK top 40 singles than any other artist of the 1980s, and Number 1 albums the world over, Phil Collins is one of the most successful artists of his generation.

The tour is named after his autobiography, published last year, and these five nights are his first live dates in 10 years.

Collins is also headlining a night at the British Summer Time Festival in Hyde Park on 30 June.

Phil Collins

Even More

If you would like even more ideas for this month have a look at the June 2017 in London blog post from our sister hotel, London Bridge Hotel.

LOOKING AHEAD

Alma-Tadema: At Home in Antiquity is at Leighton House Museum from 7 July to 29 October 2017. The exhibition explores Lawrence Alma-Tadema’s fascination with the representation of domestic life in antiquity and how this interest related to his own domestic circumstances expressed through the two remarkable studio-houses that he created in St John’s Wood, north London, together with his wife Laura and daughters.

On 14 July a major new exhibition opens at the Natural History Museum. Whales: Beneath the Surface is the family exhibition that complements the blue whale skeleton taking centre stage in the Museum’s Hintze Hall this summer. More than 100 specimens from the Museum’s research collection will be brought out from behind-the-scenes for the first time to show the huge diversity of whales, dolphins and porpoises.

And The National Portrait Gallery is to stage its first exhibition of old master European portrait drawings this summer. The Encounter: Drawings from Leonardo to Rembrandt (13 July – 22 October 2017), will include works by some of the outstanding masters of the Renaissance and Baroque, many rarely seen, and some not displayed for decades.

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Do check out the latest offers as Kensington House Hotel has some great weekend deals. You can sign up for special offer alerts here.

Laura Porter writes AboutLondonLaura.com and contributes to many other publications while maintaining an impressive afternoon tea addiction. You can find Laura on twitter as @AboutLondon and on Facebook as @AboutLondonLaura.