Sep 162015
 

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Botticelli Reimagined is a new major exhibition, opening 5th March 2016 at the V&A, exploring, for the first time the variety of ways artists and designers from the Pre-Raphaelites to the present have responded to the artistic legacy of Sandro Botticelli (1445-1510), assembling 150 works from around the world.

Botticelli Reimagined will be held at The Victoria and Albert Museum from 5th March – 3rd July 2016.  Tickets will go on sale in September this year and will cost £15 with concessions available. V&A Members go free. Advance booking is advised – this can be done in person at the V&A; online at www.vam.ac.uk/Botticelli; or by calling 0800 912 6961 (booking fee applies).

Do check out the latest offers as Kensington House Hotel has some great weekend deals. You can sign up for special offer alerts here.

Via Magellan PR, a boutique travel PR company.

Contributor: Alexandra Pinhorn – Photographs by various photographers – credits as follows: Venus,Volker-H. Schneider; Venus, after Botticelli, Private collection, courtesy Duhamel Fine Art, Paris; Portrait of a Young Man, courtesy of the National Gallery of Art, Washington; Rebirth of Venus, David LaChapelle; The Renaissance of Venus, Tate, London 2015; The Virgin and Child with Two Angels, courtesy Gemäldegalerie der Akademie der Bildenden Künste Vienna; The Orchard, Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Pallas and the Centaur, courtesy of the Ministero Beni e Att. Cultura; Portrait of a Lady known as Smeralda Bandinelli, Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Allegory of Abundance or Autumn, The Trustees of the British Museum; Venus Dress: Look 15, Catwalking.com.

Aug 202015
 

George Washington, by Sue Lowry

The statue of George Washington located at the eastern end of the National Gallery on Trafalgar Square, London was a gift to Britain by the State of Virginia.  This oversized bronze statue is a copy of the original marble sculpture by Jean-Antoine Houdon which stands in the Capitol in Richmond, Virginia.

Although originally made in 1914, it finally made it to the UK after the First World War and was unveiled in 1921 by Judith Brewer, the daughter of the then Speaker of the House of Delegates of Virginia.  Washington famously said that he would never set foot on British soil so it is rumoured that American earth was brought over and placed under the statue.  I have no idea if that is true but I do like the tale.

Do check out the latest offers as Kensington House Hotel has some great weekend deals. You can sign up for special offer alerts here.

Via Magellan PR, a boutique travel PR company.

Jul 202015
 
The boy who can fly and never grows up by Sue Lowry

The boy who can fly and never grows up by Sue Lowry

The Peter Pan statue is located in Kensington Gardens to the west of the Long Water. The creator of Peter Pan, J.M. Barrie, commissioned Sir George Frampton to build the statue in 1902. It was erected in Kensington Gardens in 1912. The Peter Pan statue features squirrels, rabbits, mice and fairies climbing up to Peter, who is stood at the top of the bronze statue. J.M. Barrie lived close to Kensington Gardens and published his first Peter Pan story in 1902, using Kensington Gardens for inspiration. In his Peter Pan tale, The Little White Bird, Peter flies out of his nursery and lands beside the Long Water. The statue is located on this exact spot.

Did you know that if you can use your smartphone to magically bring to life the 100-year-old statue. Swipe your phone on the nearby plaque to get a personal call-back from Peter Pan.

Do check out the latest offers as Kensington House Hotel has some great weekend deals. You can sign up for special offer alerts here.

Contributor: Alexandra Pinhorn Via Magellan PR, a boutique travel PR company.

May 182015
 

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You might think that innovative exhibitions were a modern-day invention but you would be oh so wrong.   The Tower of London is home to the longest running exhibition in the world – an exhibition of armour and armoury used as part Royal propaganda and part fantasy called The Line of Kings.  It’s been running for over 300 years.

By Sue Lowry

By Sue Lowry

The exhibition was especially important around the time of the restoration of the monarchy and was first put together between 1688 and 1692, seeking to impress and underline the monarch’s right to rule.   Highlights include the wooden horses, many over 325 years old themselves and of course the armours of King Henry VIII, Charles I and King James I.

By Sue Lowry

The Tower of London is operated by Historic Royal Palaces and unlimited entrance is free to members. Adult entrance is priced at GBP24 and for children aged from 5 – 15, GBP11. There are discounted rates if booked online.

By Sue Lowry

By Sue Lowry

Contributor: Sue Lowry Via Magellan PR, a boutique travel PR company.

Mar 132015
 
By Sue Lowry

By Sue Lowry

You really have to search for this statue of Edward Jenner, sculpted by William Calder Marshall and cast in bronze.  It’s now located inKensington Gardens within The Italian Gardens to be precise – but it was once – for just four years – sited more centrally at Trafalgar Square on the fourth plinth.  When Prince Albert was alive (and it was he who inaugurated the statue), it had a prominent supporter but on his untimely death, due to pressure from anti-vaccine protesters, the statue was quietly moved to the relative backwater of Kensington Gardens where it remains to this day.

Do check out the latest offers as Kensington House Hotel has some great weekend deals. You can sign up for special offer alerts here.

Feb 182015
 

1The Speke Monument by Sue Lowry

This memorial is dedicated to John Hanning Speke, the explorer who discovered Lake Victoria in East Africa and led expeditions to the source of the Nile and  lies near the junction of Lancaster Walk and Budges Walk in Kensington Gardens, one of London’s Royal Parks. It was designed by Philip Hardwick, designer of the original Euston Railway Station, hewn from Scottish red granite and erected in 1866.  It was paid for by public subscription and sponsored by the President of the Royal Geographical Society which had paid for two of Speke’s expeditions. Speke died in mysterious circumstances – shot by his own gun the day before he was due to take part in a debate about the source of the River Nile.  His claim that the source was the Rippon Falls, an outflow from Lake Victoria in east Africa, was eventually proven but he would have been opposed at the debate by fellow explorer, Sir Richard Burton.  The Royal Geographical Society said he had solved “the problem of all ages”.

Do check out the latest offers as Kensington House Hotel has some great weekend deals. You can sign up for special offer alerts here.

Contributor & photographer: Sue Lowry Via Magellan PR, a boutique travel PR company.